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Dr Xand van Tulleken shares food shopping tip that could help with weight loss

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dailyrecord.co.uk

A TV doctor has shared an expert tip to help others keep on top of their health.It's no secret that what we eat plays a role in our overall wellbeing, but it can be tough to know if what we're eating is actually good for this.

Luckily, Dr Xand van Tulleken has shared his advice about what foods are ultra-processed (UPFS) and can lead to weight gain and other issues.Speaking on BBC Morning Live, the expert spoke on his work into UPFS and how to identify them when you're doing a grocery shop.

Ultra-processed foods typically contain artificial flavours, sweeteners, colouring, and emulsifiers which are cheaper ways to preserve foods and extend their shelf life.It comes as research done in conjunction with Open University claims that over half of calories eaten by the average UK adult derive from UPFs, reports Wales Online.

Dr Xan said he cut them out of his diet two years ago, which has seen him lose weight and feel much better and he recommends trying to phase them out of your diet.It can be confusing knowing exactly what makes a UPF, so he suggests studying ingredient labels in supermarkets before buying and if you don't recognise a lot of them, the food is probably ultra-processed."Despite some research linking it to ill health, what is and isn’t UPF can be hard to spot – and labels do not help," he said. "Food manufacturers use all the tricks in the trade to try and persuade us that their products are healthy and we should buy them."But before you spend money on those health clams, it is worth reading the ingredient list because the more things on that list you don’t recognise, the more ultra-processed that food is likely to be and if you can start leaving ultra-processed food on the supermarket shelf, that may be good

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